News — CO2

Compressed Gas Association Warns About Carbonated Beverage Systems in Safety Alert

The Compressed Gas Association (CGA) has released a safety alert entitled, "Potential of Carbonated Beverage Systems to Create a Life-Threatening Environment" The pamphlet can be downloaded here. This safety alert was released in response to reports of several incidents involving improperly installed or poorly maintained carbonated beverage systems that have created hazardous concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in enclosed areas causing restaurant patrons, employees, and first responders to get sick or die. The pamphlet advises that, “Carbon dioxide detectors with alarm systems should be installed in appropriate areas to detect hazardous concentrations of carbon dioxide. Do not depend upon measuring...

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CO2 Sensors vs. VOC Sensors for IAQ - What's the Difference?

People sometimes ask about the differences between VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) sensors and CO2 sensors. While both can be used to measure indoor air quality (IAQ), these sensors are not interchangeable. They measure very different things. CO2 sensing technology by IR (infrared) is stable and is not subject to the short-term, random drift found in air quality sensors. Most IR carbon dioxide sensors only measure CO2. A CO2 sensor is designed to control the ventilation rate in occupied spaces. People are the principal source of CO2 in indoor air. Whereas outside air carbon dioxide levels tend to be relatively low...

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New pSense Portable CO2 Meter Video on YouTube

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CO2 In the Classroom

If you are a parent, do you think about the air quality in your child’s classroom? You should. Every classroom requires a constant flow of fresh, conditioned air to make it comfortable for students. In the past, this was not a problem. Pre-WWII school buildings “leaked” fresh air into the building around windows and through open doors. Although “leaky” buildings insure fresh air, they are also more expensive to heat and cool. A common solution was to incorporate permanently sealed windows in new building designs. While this solution saved energy, it had the unexpected consequence of sealing in mold, bacteria,...

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NOAA study: Slowing climate change by targeting gases other than carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide remains the undisputed king of recent climate change, but other greenhouse gases measurably contribute to the problem. A new study, conducted by NOAA scientists and published in Nature Journal Online, shows that cutting emissions of those other gases could slow changes in climate that are expected in the future. Discussions with colleagues around the time of the 2009 United Nations' climate conference in Copenhagen inspired three NOAA scientists – Stephen Montzka, Ed Dlugokencky and James Butler of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo. – to review the sources of non-carbon dioxide (CO2) greenhouse gases and explore the...

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